Keep up to date with

Special Gift Offer
URL:
http://www.gardengatemagazine.com/newsletter/2009/12/22/boxwood-winterburn/
Share Article:

Winter burn

By: Garden Gate staff
The leaves of your broadleaf evergreens look green now, but the leaf edges of broadleaf evergreens, such as boxwoods (Buxus spp.), turn bronze in winter.

problem solver

Winter burn

IDENTIFICATION — The leaves of your broadleaf evergreens look green now, but the leaf edges of broadleaf evergreens, such as boxwoods (Buxus spp.), turn bronze in winter.

DAMAGE — Plants can experience winter burn, even in milder climates, as they contend with cold, dry air and wind. That wind can suck the moisture right out of leaves. And if water isn’t plentiful or the ground is frozen, the roots can’t take up any additional moisture. In a worst-case scenario, the branch can dry out completely and die.

CONTROL — Prevent winter burn by watering your plant well during dry spells through­out the growing season, as well as during warm spells in winter. Mulch to keep soil moist in summer and prevent rapid soil temperature changes. Also, apply an antidesiccant spray, such as Wilt-Pruf®, in late fall and again in late winter. Products like this help reduce water evaporation from leaves.

Tags:
  • None
Share Article:

Also in This Newsletter


Last Week’s Newsletter

December 15, 2009

Twice is nice

Would you like the amaryllis you’re growing right now to bloom again next summer? And did you know spring-started amaryllis can bloom all summer and then again indoors in winter?

Mineral deposits

Along with soil and light, water is one of those essential things that you need to grow plants.