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Ficus leaf drop

By: Garden Gate staff
If you’ve grown a ficus, you probably know that it can be a little finicky about where it calls home; the leaves will turn yellow and drop off for no apparent reason.

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Ficus leaf drop

If you’ve grown a ficus, you probably know that it can be a little finicky about where it calls home; the leaves will turn yellow and drop off for no apparent reason. It does this because something in the environment has changed. Perhaps you moved it recently and now it’s not getting enough light, or it’s getting too much, or it’s sitting under an air vent and drying out.

Losing its leaves won’t necessarily kill your ficus, though. Many times, the plant will put out new leaves and will be fine. Click on the photo to see what the new growth looks like.

Whatever the cause, house plants need a consistent environment. If you need to relocate one, do it in smaller steps over a period of time. Move the plant to its final home for a few hours each day. Instead of a quick change that shocks the plant and causes dramatic reactions — like dropping all its leaves — a gradual move will allow it to adapt to its new environment.

Published: Oct. 7, 2008
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