Special Gift Offer
URL:
http://www.gardengatemagazine.com/newsletter/2009/11/10/rose-slug-sawfly/
Share:

Rose slug sawfly

By: Garden Gate staff
Smooth, translucent pale-green larvae eat the leaves of roses in May and June.

Click to see a larger image.

problem solver

Rose slug sawfly Endelomyia aethiops

IDENTIFICATION — Smooth, translucent pale-green larvae could attack the leaves of your roses next May and June.

DAMAGE — Feeding on the surface of the foliage between the veins, larvae create a window-pane look. Leaves turn brown and curl. Large infestations may stunt the plant’s growth.

CONTROL — Prune out or handpick small populations. On cloudy days (so you don’t burn the leaves) in early summer, spray all plant surfaces with Safer® insecticidal soap or horticultural oil to smother younger larvae. These controls don’t work as well on older larvae, but most of the damage has already been done by then.

If there are so many larvae that the plants stop growing and blooming, dust the affected plants with an insecticide containing carbaryl, such as Sevin®. Or dilute and spray spinosad on all leaf surfaces in early summer. And all season, pick up debris and leaves from around plants to remove any larvae that may be hiding there.

Published: Nov. 10, 2009
Share:
Tags:
  • None
GDT_ContainersSIB2023_zone5

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work in the garden. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.

GDT_Botanical Collection_300x250_022024

Also in This Newsletter

Garden Gate
Newsletter
Archive


GDT Ad_ItalyTour2024_720x90
GDT_SubPromoAd_DigitalPremium_zone7and11MOBILE_Free_Book
Last Week’s Newsletter

November 3, 2009

‘Golden Ring’ barberry

‘Golden Ring’ barberry has burgundy leaves that don’t fade or bleach in hot summer sun. In fall, the leaves, especially in the center of the plant, turn bright orange-red, so the entire plant seems to glow.

Fuller’s teasel

Originally introduced from Europe for use as a dried flower, Fuller’s teasel has naturalized in much of North America.

GDT_SubPromoAd_DigitalPremium_zone15_Free_Book