Special Gift Offer
URL:
http://www.gardengatemagazine.com/newsletter/2009/10/13/rust/
Share:

Rust

By: Garden Gate staff
You’ll spot powdery rust, orange or brown spots, like these on a snapdragon, on either side of the leaf.

PHOTO: © Joseph G. Strauch, Jr.

problem solver

Rust

IDENTIFICATION — You’ll spot powdery rust, orange or brown spots, like these on a snapdragon, on either side of the leaf. It’s most common in summer and fall, but can appear at any time.?

DAMAGE — Rust spores are carried by wind and water to infect plants during humid conditions. Affected plants include geraniums, asters, mums, snapdragons and peonies and also surrounding plants. Not only is it unsightly, rust weakens the plant, reducing flower and fruit production.

CONTROL — Remove and destroy infected leaves. Try to keep the foliage dry when you water and improve air circulation around the plant by removing dense vegetation nearby. Also, read descriptions to find resistant cultivars for your garden. If you still want to grow a susceptible plant, check with your local garden center for a fungicide you can spray in early summer as a preventative measure.

Published: Oct. 13, 2009
Share:
Tags:
  • None
GDT Notes Ad_Garden Tips SIB 2021_zone5

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work in the garden. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.

GDT_HTCSubAd_240x230

Also in This Newsletter


GDT Free Issues zone7and11 Mobile_Spring
Last Week’s Newsletter

October 6, 2009

Cyclamen

It’s hard to say which is more appealing about cyclamen: The perky fall flowers or the charming round to heart-shaped leaves.

Prostrate spurge

The stems and undersides of the leaves of 2-in.-tall prostrate spurge have a red tint.

GDT_Printful Ad_zone15