Special Gift Offer
URL:
http://www.gardengatemagazine.com/newsletter/2009/05/12/fungal-iris-leaf-spot/
Share:

Powdery mildew

By: Garden Gate staff
The white granular patches look like dust on the stems, the tops and bottoms of leaves and occasionally on flowers and fruit.

problem solver

Powdery mildew

IDENTIFICATION — The white granular patches look like dust on the stems, the tops and bottoms of leaves and occasionally on flowers and fruit of phlox, lilac, bee balm, aster, rose, lungwort, zinnia (in the photo), crabapple and many others.

DAMAGE — Spores of powdery mildew move by air. Powdery mildew won’t kill a plant; it only affects the appearance. You’ll find it any time during the growing season wherever susceptible plants are grown.

PREVENTION — Plant resistant varieties. Keep plants healthy and well watered to avoid stress. Always provide good air circulation around susceptible plants. Apply potassium bicarbonate fungicides and horticultural oils before you find mildew or spray them to keep the problem from spreading to more leaves or other plants.

Published: May 12, 2009
Share:
Tags:
  • None
GDT_ContainersSIB2023_zone5

Product Recommendations

Here are some supplies and tools we find essential in our everyday work in the garden. We may receive a commission from sales referred by our links; however, we have carefully selected these products for their usefulness and quality.

GDT_NetherlandsTour2024_300x250

Also in This Newsletter

Garden Gate
Newsletter
Archive


GDT Ad_ItalyTour2024_720x90
GDT_SubPromoAd_DigitalPremium_zone7and11MOBILE_Free_Book
Last Week’s Newsletter

May 5, 2009

Slide show: Reseeding annuals

Reseeding annuals are not only beautiful, they’re great buys. Plant them once and for years after you get new plants for free!

Poison oak

As with their close relative, poison ivy, “Leaves of three, let it be” is good advice.

GDT_Backyard Retreat_865x490