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Blossom-end rot on peppers

By: Garden Gate staff
Blossom-end rot is a common problem with peppers, tomatoes, melons and squash. It starts out as a round, sunken, soft spot at the end of the pepper and grows steadily larger.

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Blossom-end rot on peppers

IDENTIFICATION — Blossom-end rot is a common problem with peppers, as well as tomatoes, melons and squash. It starts out as a round, sunken, soft spot at the end of the pepper and grows steadily larger. Blossom-end rot is caused by a calcium deficiency in the developing fruit. The calcium deficiency is caused by fluctuating moisture and too much nitrogen that stress the plants. Deep cultivation and salt burn can also cause stress that may result in blossom-end rot.

CONTROL — To keep your fruits and vegetables healthy, mulch around them to keep the soil evenly moist and cool. Feed the plants with a low-nitrogen fertilizer at planting and give them about an inch of water per week. If you still have problems, spray your plants with a calcium chloride solution that you can find at your local garden center. Start spraying when the fruits begin to form and continue on a weekly basis for four weeks. Be sure to wash the fruit as you normally would before eating.

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